Texas Fishing Forum

Running trot lines...

Posted By: CrappieTuna

Running trot lines... - 09/03/19 02:40 PM

Just looking for some tips on maybe a better set up. I use about 100' of 500 para cord running lines about every 5' with 16" of drop. Each hook has 200# barrel swivels on them (Extra ones I have for my tuna rigs offshore haha) and I use circle hooks, cant remember the size off the top of my head but the loop is about the size of a quarter.

I tie my lines up between two trees at the edge of a channel in lake Palestine and the line is set about 2' below the water line. I dont have any problems and my lines usually yield about 10 fish per line and the biggest we usually catch being in the 20# range but have hooked (Im guessing) in the 40# range but Ive only gotten one of them in the boat, the other ones get off when I bring them up to the boat and they turn into a tornado and get off.

Anyways, Im just looking for some tips on things I may be doing wrong or things I can improve on to catch more fish. Between the boys and my wife, they eat the fish so fast its hard to store any, they wipe out my crappie even faster!

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Posted By: DJ BANCO

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/03/19 02:56 PM

what do you use for bait?
Posted By: CrappieTuna

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/03/19 03:00 PM

Forgot to add that in, sorry. I either use shad or goldfish. Goldfish most of the time
Posted By: bigcheessee

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/03/19 05:34 PM

I run mine in the creeks during the spring after heavy rains when shad spawn. Empty weed eater spoils is what I put my long line on spaced in line w/regulations. I use a 5 # weight to drop it. My philosophy is it doesn’t really matter how you rig it. Over all I use shad, sliced cut tails & bloody as hell. I figure w/all those damn hooks in the water should get something. I’ll run them for 2-3 weeks.
Posted By: RespectTheFish

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/03/19 06:15 PM

What hooks do you use?

I use 6/0 or 7/0 J hooks and I feel like I hardly ever lose fish.

Shad is always a great bait but I prefer using cut carp with the hook going through the meat and skin. It’s very difficult to get off of the hook and therefore you will catch more fish on any unmanned fishing approach such as trotline a, juglines, limblines. There’s times I put 24 hooks out and have 18 fish on my line.
Posted By: CrappieTuna

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/03/19 09:12 PM

big cheese, I have the best luck in later spring but where I fish I always have good luck. The only problem is summer time I catch a bunch of 10" fish that are biting empty hooks, I will have at least 5 or 6 of them but I throw them back to grow, they taste good that size but I get tired of cleaning them that small.

Respect, I usually use eagle claw and I cant remember the size, Im offshore right now so I cant go look, but I think they are 6/0. Ill have to try carp, thatll be a good use for the ones we shoot when we bowfish, I usually just give them to an older guy at the boat ramp and now that you say that, Im assuming thats what hes using them for. I have a bigger problem with gar or turtles getting my goldfish off my hooks.
Posted By: RespectTheFish

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/03/19 11:52 PM

Yep I bowfish as well and use them up. If you shoot enough of them I usually just fillet after the ribs towards the tail and bypass the ribs altogether to save a ton of time and effort. If it’s big enough I may go back and cut the back strap off near the ribs.

In winter I love trotlining up in shallow 3-6 fow with my trotline suspended from the surface by the help of swim noodles every few hooks. No gar problems and so many catfish up shallow even though the water may be 40 degrees. I think this is one of the best kept secrets! So many ppl fish in 40 fow thinking it’s cold so the blues are deep when there are several fish up shallow including my PB blue at 42 pounds. If you haven’t tried it give it a go this winter near grass mud flats.
Posted By: Catfish Lynn

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/04/19 01:32 AM

I have finally settled on 36 hook trotlines, as you set two & that is 72 hooks, which gives you 28 more hooks to apply to juglines, etc. I have two main designs, SW (Shallow Water) & BW (Big Water). THe SW is usually set in Lake Limestone, ranging in areas from 8' to 13'.

Currently, I am after one monster Op we call "The Giant", well over 100 #. On May 5th, 2018 Saturday about 4 to 5 PM, I thought I had a nice one, then as I got closer, it felt larger & gave bigger tugs. At first, maybe a 14#. Then closer, up to 30#. Even closer, up to 60+#. Until it clicked, when I was almost over it, Oh Cr_ _!, it's "The Giant". I had size 36 green twist main line, size 36 green solid braid lear lines, not sure which hook I had on this one it was on, and size 4/0 SS barrel swivel or 3/0 Brass Barrel Swivel. I am thinking the SS. I was right over it & it dove hard. As it did, I decided the only chance I had, was to yank that stinker up in the air & into the boat since the hook held this long. But about that time, it snapped my leader line, just above the hook. To my surprise, the leader was not solid braid, as it was supposed to be, it had a core. Later, I realized I was lucky, as fighting with it in the 12 footer was too easy for it to turn the boat over.

The other I usually set up with a special design, called "The Planter", which uses a levee/pulley type set-up I can set anywhere on the lake, preferably over 20 feet deep. I do not need anything to tie too, as this. On each end are concrete anchors weighing about 60 to 72#. What is really work, is pulling them.

On my 36 hook main lines, there are 4 divisions of 9. They are about 4 feet apart (SW)). For the BW- 5 to 6' apart for leaders. My leaders are usually 18", up to 24" max. I use small vinyl tumblers filled with concrete, for weights. Plus some loops to attach these two to lower the line. And some water bottles. You fill them with the lake water, then empty a small amount up, so that it will also help to pull the main line up.
Posted By: RespectTheFish

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/04/19 02:24 AM

I'd be curious to see your BW trotline or a picture of how it works. Most people do not trotline in open deeper water because of how tricky it can be. My best attempt is to use a heavy weight big enough to hold my boat on at least the upwind side of the trotline. Then attach several feet of rope from it to a manageable weight like 15 pounds or so which is tied to my trotline. The trotline then terminates to another manageable weight way on the other end with another about 15 pounds worth of weight and optional for windy conditions a tie from it to another heavy heavy weight but this usually isn't necessary. That way I can start on the downwind side of my trotline, grab the buoy attached the 15 pound weight, pull up and run my line while the big heavy weight on the other end allows me to pull my boat along. Up shallow I just use smaller weights and no need for the big heavy weight usually.
Posted By: CrappieTuna

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/04/19 04:22 PM

I usually stay in shallow water in the winter time with two lines I have and I run a 200' line. The only thing I hate about shallow water in the winter is big debris in the lake floating into my stuff. I was never told that information but found it out on accident, I had no experience with running lines and was messing around and figured that out. Unfortunately almost all of my fishing experience was self taught or from catching tid bits from forums. No dad and my grandpa died a long time ago so Ive been winging it ever since lol.

My lines are never in water more than 15' deep. I almost always set it in 7' of water fishing 2 1/2' deep and let them run and night and collect them in the morning. I dont mess with deep water except for crappie.
Posted By: banker-always fishing

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/05/19 01:30 AM

Nice post and fish. Good job. thumb



Side Note: Looks like you have a Lifetime Fishing Buddy! cheers
Posted By: Catfish Lynn

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/05/19 03:26 AM

To fully grasp "The Planter" set-up, I would have to draw it out & fully detail it. I talked with a Game Warden back in the early to mid 1980s, to give him an idea of how it was set up & find out if it was legal. He said, I don't see why not.

In brief, you have two "Planter" sides to attach to. the 3.5 gallon bucket (on each side) is filled with concrete, along with 2 heavy duty galvanized loops that form a "+" if looking down at them. I use 1/4" solid braid nylon (1 piece, no knots or splices) to attach to the buckets, weighing from 60 to 72 pounds depending on how full of concrete you fill it. The rop goes up to the surface, and attaches snug to a white fender float, preferred 30" to 24" so that it sits upright. An 18" white fender float is attached to the top hole on the anchor float, but needs just a bit of slack, so it will not get in a bind. This is your "pointer". Once everything is rigged up, it will angle down, pointing towards the other side. A 3rd fender float (24") is attached also to the top of the anchor float with about 4 to 6" of nylon rope. This is your safety float, in the event somebody punctures any of the floats. Sadly there are idiots who intentionally run them over. Also, in case the lake rises, amazingly the other two floats can lift the weight & this one will lay flat. In the event all 3 are damaged, not to worry, as you still can gain access on the other side.

When you set the anchors, you must make sure the area is clear, as well as your feet & hands. Alays wear your hunting knife & have a pocketknife in your pants pocket. Because once you set the anchor over the edge of the boat & let it sail to the bottom, the last thing you want, is to somehow get snagged & yanked overboard. Now you can understand why I call it the "Planter", as it flies to the bottom, it literally plants itself into the floor of the lake. I will tell you what is fun. When it is time to pull lines, getting the anchors loose is a whole other story. For those that cannot handle such weights, I have alternative weights & methods, but none hold near as good.

As for the BW trotline, it is close to similar to the SW trotlines, except that you need a 1/4" rope slider to go up & down the anchor rope. A larger loop on the anchor line with a smaller loop to tie the trotline to. However, you need a good 20 to 30 feet of trotline cord to tie to the loop and the Big Water trotline. What this does is keep the big fish from coming over, wrapping up any of the corded lines, as well as the anchor line. Connected to the pointer float is the drop line. This not only helps show you if you have a problem, and it is the one you raise the trotline with. I usually set the trotline to about 2 to 3 feet off bottom with small weights having 3" leaders. You set the main line at any depth, as well as diagonal. But understand if you set to near the surface, a big boat can plow down some 10 to 15 feet taking off, snagging your line easily. This is why I now have a general rule of not running Planters during Spring Break in March, and from Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day weekend. Plus of course the thermocline, the skiers, big boats, and jet skis.

Everybody that has gone with me when I run the Planters, say it is really a neat set-up. Jeff had a really big Cat messing with him at the top of Lake Limestone, so we talked in June 2011 of me helping him set up a Planter to finally catch it. But things went sort of awry after that day. The Lake dropped 10' by Turkey Day holiday. And sadly, Jeff & his second wife were brutally murdered in September (two months earlier). Sadly, we never got to go after that big Cat. His son James did get to go with me several times to run my Planter. Due to the weight of the anchors, we use the 14' Mon Ark. The new AlumaCraft 12' probably would not be able to handle them.

I might be putting a book together finally which will touch on the Planters, Catfish Calendar, YellowCats, and such.
Posted By: CrappieTuna

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/05/19 11:56 AM

Lynn, I used to run a set up somewhat close to what you explained, or what I think you explained. I would run into problems with the current rolling tree limbs and logs over my lines and I would have to dive down to go get them which isnt a huge deal but gets tiring after doing it almost every time I collect my fish and would lose fish because of it. Lake Palestine is bad for lots of trees and debris and I really like using that set up too. My son loves pushing the concrete blocks off the front of the boat
Posted By: DJ BANCO

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/05/19 03:22 PM

Great Advice I will have to try the 3-6 feet in winter with the noodels. do you happen to have a pic of your set up to share.

Originally Posted by RespectTheFish
Yep I bowfish as well and use them up. If you shoot enough of them I usually just fillet after the ribs towards the tail and bypass the ribs altogether to save a ton of time and effort. If it’s big enough I may go back and cut the back strap off near the ribs.

In winter I love trotlining up in shallow 3-6 fow with my trotline suspended from the surface by the help of swim noodles every few hooks. No gar problems and so many catfish up shallow even though the water may be 40 degrees. I think this is one of the best kept secrets! So many ppl fish in 40 fow thinking it’s cold so the blues are deep when there are several fish up shallow including my PB blue at 42 pounds. If you haven’t tried it give it a go this winter near grass mud flats.
Posted By: RespectTheFish

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/05/19 09:55 PM

Originally Posted by DJ BANCO
Great Advice I will have to try the 3-6 feet in winter with the noodels. do you happen to have a pic of your set up to share.

Originally Posted by RespectTheFish
Yep I bowfish as well and use them up. If you shoot enough of them I usually just fillet after the ribs towards the tail and bypass the ribs altogether to save a ton of time and effort. If it’s big enough I may go back and cut the back strap off near the ribs.

In winter I love trotlining up in shallow 3-6 fow with my trotline suspended from the surface by the help of swim noodles every few hooks. No gar problems and so many catfish up shallow even though the water may be 40 degrees. I think this is one of the best kept secrets! So many ppl fish in 40 fow thinking it’s cold so the blues are deep when there are several fish up shallow including my PB blue at 42 pounds. If you haven’t tried it give it a go this winter near grass mud flats.



I don’t have a picture unfortunately...but I can explain it easy. Get the small swim noodles right now before they stop selling them. Cut them something like 12-15 inches or whatever makes one stick come out even with no waste. Add a piece of pvc through the noodles to give it back bone. I wrap the very middle of the noodle with a little duck tape to protect it and then zip tie a trotline clip over the noodle where the duck tape is. The reason I like the smaller diameter swim noodles is you can fit several of them into a five galllon bucket and don’t need the extra bouncy of the bigger noodle for what we are doing. Just clip it to the main line every two or three hooks. I build my trotline with hooks every 6-7 feet.

I had a picture I wish I kept but one good place I set it out was where vehicles drove through the grass when the lake was low and now there were stick ups everywhere in that 3-4 foot deep area and I put my trotline on that road/path! Had 11 fish on 12 hooks with some 20 plus pounders...just another day out lol
Posted By: CrappieTuna

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/06/19 01:09 PM

Lynn, I want to try your set up at some point so if you dont mind drawing up a picture of what it looks like, when you get some time of course, Ill run one of those when I run mine also this winter. I have a few good SW spots that id like to try where the trees arent as common. I understand what you are saying about the noodles but the main lines I get confused when you are talking about the floats.
Posted By: Ed-n-eddy

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/06/19 01:56 PM

It appears that Lynn is describing how to suspend the trotline with the floats. Pretty cool idea using the trotline clips. In my lake, his suspended trotlining would be super effective in March.
Posted By: CrappieTuna

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/06/19 04:08 PM

Thats what I was thinking he was explaining. It does sound very effective and in spring and winter I always have good luck fishing nearest the surface
Posted By: Catfish Lynn

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/07/19 10:30 AM

My apologies, as I had started to write Wednesday or Thursday night, but fell asleep. As I awoke at the keyboard, I decided to erase the 4 or 5 lines (I think), since I did not have time to continue, And instead of copy N pasting what I had so far, I didn't. Very long hot week at work.

On Lake Limestone, I have not had a problem with rolling logs. But I fish on the bottom of the lake (far side to near side, and the Running Creek Branch), not where the river feeds in. I did have a problem on Trinity River below TX 21 once. I spotted a bobbing 20 footer & had to take evasive action. I had one trotline running across where "Big'Un" (took me two years to catch her- a 60+ pound Op) was located at. I tied to the floating end that was bobbing up & down in the water & took off. It brought it all to the surface & I passed over all my lines until after I had passed my camp. Then I untied & let it go its own way from there. Back then, I was running an old deeper & very sturdy 1962 Elgin flat bottom from Sears my Dad bought new with several braces & back straps reinforced to take torque without ripping out the back, since I was utilizing a 47 pound Wards Sea King by Chrysler 15 HP short shallow stocky motor. If they still made that motor, I would get another now for my new 12 footer 2017 AlumaCraft flat bottom.

As to "The Planter" style trotline, it is mainly the ends that are my "Planter" design. I finally got to put the mid to early 1980s idea into action in phase 2 of the Catfish Calendar research (on lakes) starting in 2002 on Lake Limestone out of Running Branch Creek Marina & Campground. Phase 1 was 3+ years (on rivers)- on the Trinity River some 25 bends or so down from the TX21 bridge ranging from 18 feet to 25 feet deep. The first one in action only had two gallon concrete weights each side & only two floats (anchor & pointer). In rough windy weather during my T-day trip in 2003, Darrell (he & Nancy own RB) took me out T-Day about 10:30 AM in a Tri-Hull, as my motor conked out backing it off the trailer (water got into the electronics & fried it on the 14' MonArk flat bottom with 25 HP Evinrude, due to flipping over in a storm we got caught at on the far side at that pier. Darrell had a blast as I was getting dashed with waves up front, as he was toting fish back to his two livewells. We had them both overstuffed with Blues. However, I could tell I needed to make some adjustments, as I could tell I was dragging the anchors loose. So I went to 3.5 gallon buckets. It can be done with 2- two gallon each sside, as well as 4- one gallon buckets. But it gets complicated, but for folks who can't handle a 60 to 72 pound anchor & retrieving it, I had to have alternatives (options) available.

The BW trotline is attached to an extra cord of about 20 to 25 feet that gets the first hook at least some 20'+ away from the anchor line, as you do not want a Big Blue or Op to mummy wrap themselves. If they get it entangle with the anchor line, then you will have to pull, take care of the mess & start all over. So the safety measure prevents those mishaps. I think I referred to the slider already, which is made from the 1/4" solid braided cord, utilizing two big loops (one slightly larger). The slider connects the anchor line to the 20/25 footer of cord allowing the trotline attached to easily slide up & down.

The BW trotline sets the leaders at about 5 feet apart to 6 feet, but not any more. The SW trotlines sets them at 4 feet apart (just beyond the 3 feet minimum).

The main design of both incorporate four section of 9 leaders. The variations come on the ends. IN SW, you need to come off of what you are tying to, have enough to tie around the attachment & get the line to drop fast, in order to clear props of others. While the BW does not need that.

A 36 hook BW consists (from one side to the other) of 5 more safety feet, then 9 leaders, a loop, 9 leaders, a center loop, 9 leaders, a loop, 9 leaders, 5 more safety feet. A loop is created on the extra 20 to 25 footer just about 1 foot before tying to the BW trotline. This loop is for a weight & the pointer float cord line, also called the drop line.

All weights are drinking tumblers, hopefully of soft vinyl, not hard plastic, filled with concrete, one U-shape galvanized loop, tie line from loop to a slit in top of tumbler (this keeps both together, as eventually they get loose), along with a 3 foot cord.

On most loops, a weight & regular (16.9 oz) water bottle) are used in conjunction to pull the main line to 3 feet off bottom, but the water bottle is used as a ballast to raise the line keeping the main line fom dropping below 3 feet. On the empty water bottle- tie around twice & tighten 6" to 1 feet of cord to bottle neck. When attaching, fill bottle with lake water, then dump a slight amount, so that the air pocket makes the line float, but not enough to pull the weight up.

A 36 hook SW consists (from one side to the other) of about 5 to 6 feet of attachment (you can do this by using another cord), 3 feet prelim, a drop weight loop, 3 leaders, a loop, 6 leaders, a loop, 9 leaders, a center loop, 9 leaders, a loop, 6 leaders, a loop, 3 leaders, a drop weight loop, 3 feet of prelim, and your 5 to 6 foot for attachment as needed (which you could do separately, as you may tie & wrap an extra round on a big stump, or possibly be tying to a small limb, as to variations needed in length.
Posted By: Catfish Lynn

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/07/19 10:37 AM

"The Planter" idea came up because of being out on a lake, you simply have nothing sturdy (or nothing period) to attach to. So with this design, you "plant it wherever you wish). Once again, I suggest in 20 feet or deeper water. The most shallow depth I have tried was 16 feet. But your flexibility is curtailed quite a bit by the shallow depth. My best working depth as to the areas I use, ranges from 30 to 40 feet deep. Plus, it is best you use a 14 footer (boat) for these hefty weights, as it may not be stable in most 12 footers.
Posted By: Catfish Lynn

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/07/19 10:47 AM

Also, these are not noodles, but very soft vinyl fender floats. I prefer white. You mark the "pointer" float with your dated trotline tag info. When you get thru running a line, rebaiting, etc., both pointers should face each other. If one veers off or worse, then something is not correct. Pull that drop line & fix the problem.

Also if you notice, fender floats have a plug. On the anchor line float, plug will be on the down side. On the pointer line float, the plug should be on the end attaching to the anchor float. And the safety float plug should be on the end that the rope connects it to the anchor line.

Anchor line needs to be 24" to 30" (could be 36"). Pointer float should be 18" to 24". Safety float about 24" to 30".
Posted By: Texas Grown

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/07/19 05:26 PM

Lynn, Think I understand the part about the main line weights and floats to keep it off the bottom 3 foot. Is what your doing with the anchor ropes on the BW sets, creating a "hitching post" for the ends of the trot-line to attach to? Then using smaller loops on the anchor ropes so the ends of the trot-line will slide up and down the anchor lines? And using a 18" bumper with a cord attached to the trot-line/mainline to pull the trot-line up and run it?

My apologies. I'm having a hard time visualizing what your doing.
Posted By: Brew

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/07/19 07:21 PM

I found the cheapest bait for trotline catfish is "Slim Jims". Cut it into pieces about 1/4 to 1/2" pieces.
Posted By: Catfish Lynn

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/07/19 10:36 PM

Texas Grown,

Yep, you got it! The anchor setups of the Planter are your attachment ends (Hitchin' Post), to which the BW trotline is attached to, and raised the line (also called Pointer/Hoist float to check as well as to set heighth or depth). To which you can also raise to certain heights to fish at, including if you wish to set the trotline at a diagonal (angle).

But just remember one thing, if setting the line up near the surface, and you are on the main lake, regardless of skiers or just big boats, if the big boat powers down, they literally can dig down 10 feet & snag, cut, or mangle the BW trotline. And if not running off the bottom, then weights must be very little or none. No water bottkles with just a bit of air, or you could pull the line up to the surface at each bottle location. And if running shallower, you may need to set the anchors to where they pull the main trotline tighter, as being away from the anchors, the anchor line will tilt towards the opposite side. So there are variables & adjustments which need to be compensated for how you plan to utilize it. The heighth of the anchor rope needs to be as tight as possible when tying to the bottom of the anchor float. Be sure you have enough extra rope. When I set them, it is in about 36 feet, so I get the rolls of 50 feet & trim off excess (but leave one enough should I need to adjust if the lake rises (but I can say, that is not a fun chore, so you hope for the best, that once set, it is done). The rope can give some, so a 3 feet rise in lake level should be fine. Once you cross a 5' rise, then it might present a problem.

When setting anchors, set the first one, attach BW trotline with double loop slider with a 5 foot temp line to keep near the surface, then proceed out & set opposite anchor where you think it will be a snug fit. Once anchor is set & it seems loose for the trotline, you can "unplant" it, and move anchor further out. Set your length of desired depth (heighth) by cutting the length of cord, attach weight to the loop nearest the anchor on the 20 to 25 footer safety cord & let it drop. It may go all the way or not. Go to the opposite side & do the same. The pointer/drop floats should point to each other. If not, one of two things to check for- (1) entangled drop line, or (2) anchors are set too tight (too close together).

And remember one thing, "The Planter" is designed with give, for less impact on the fish. Unless you utilize this when thermocline is active, it works wonders. Use very flexible fender floats, as you want something soft, should someone hit it (I am talking like perhaps a skier). DO NOT use some sort of PVC frame or floating tube, as that is considered something blocking the waterways, and can hurt someone if they hit it, including maiming a boat. It will be removed from the lake. We have already encountered this problem and explained everything, its operation & so on. We were trying to make it more visible, while not realizing other problems it may cause. You can always educate a Lake Ranger or Game Warden that normally runs that lake, in order to show them how it operates, so they don't make a mess trying to check your line for legality or fish later.

We have been using "The Planter" for many years, upgrading its design here & there & to get to this point of satisfaction that we are as safe as possible for skiers & boats, and less impact on the fish. As well as get to be friends with the Lake Rangers & Game Wardens, by keeping things informed, as well as safe, and of course, also legal.
Posted By: Catfish Lynn

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/07/19 10:44 PM

If you should want to try it on a river, my suggestion is to be at least 18 feet deep & set it directly in the middle of the river, if narrow, in line with river. Or off to side, running in line with the river. Ifyou are in a super wide river, then you might try a diagonal slant. Newt (one of my YellowCat teachers) taught me to run a diagonal slant on trotlines in the river (on the Brazos River). Just take into mind, that if the river jumps up, it can lift the anchors & carry off your setup. By being in line, you fend of most debris & logs. But nothing is perfect. "The Planter" was designed mainly for lakes, or big enough areas on rivers, or super wide rivers to place trotlines where you normally can't put them.
Posted By: Texas Grown

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/08/19 01:24 AM

Great info Lynn! Thanks for answering my questions and then some. I haven't run lines in several years. But have been recently thinking about it to show my grandboys what can be done. Your BW method really makes sense. I have been using trees in the past to tie off to on both ends, usually running along a tree line. Then dropping weights down X number of feet to set depth on both ends. That also helps keep the line taught when slack is taken out of main line. But is difficult to set deep when needing to run lines till you get a little ways away from the ends. 12 feet down is usually not a problem. But much deeper than that is when it gets hard to handle till you get away from the ends. The weight on the ends helps keep the lines taught when running them. I usually use window weights or small anchors for the ends to hold the lines down. Some of the trees I have fished are pretty thick. And I have to be careful running through them. It's and idle through boat area in 15-25' FOW. laugh

Your method sounds like it might could be used on one end when running away from the trees too. That would create a "hitching post" on one end. And a tree on the other angling downward away from the tree. out into open water.
Posted By: Catfish Lynn

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/08/19 04:00 AM

With "The Planter", you open possibilities where before, you may not have had any or very few. As you try for what level or angle, or even using just one side, you can adjust as you see fit (or need to).

The people that have gone with me, are always amazed as to how it is set up & operated. And some have looked at the scope & said, Whoa, that's a lot of fish down there. When my Uncle ranm with me, we each had a Planter set out. I would set mine in my spot on the Far Side at the bottom portion of the lake. He wanted his near the dam about midways across the bottom portion of the lake

Also, your cord attaching to the pointer float, when pulled up (such as in 36 feet of water, you have about 32' to 33' excess floating around) can wrap around the anchor setup, but there are methods, such as working with the wind & keeping the excess cord in the boat until you have to let it go out. Once thru checking & rebaiting, look to see if those floats are pointing to each other. If not, you may need to go to the other side & play with it, to reset it correctly. I've done it enough, to where I know how to prevent it about 80% of the time.
Posted By: Catfish Lynn

Re: Running trot lines... - 09/08/19 04:04 AM

Sometimes, when I run in the shallows 8' to 12' on the SW lines, the path might be clear in a strauight shot except for one tree, stump, or such. What I do, is use a tie-off line in order to pull the line to angle away from the obstruction. Just attach a weight to each end of the tie off line so it will allow the tie-off line to get low & clear props.
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