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Jan 23rd, 2013
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2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues #14017793 06/01/21 09:46 PM
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ccolt01 Offline OP
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Just looking for some advice. Found out this weekend that one of the bolts attaching the jack plate to the transom on my boat has been leaking. Looks like the transom will need to be replaced. Anyone had any experience with this? Any recommendations on who to use in the DFW or East Texas areas? Any help/insight would be appreciated. Thanks.

Moritz Chevrolet - 9101 Camp Bowie W Blvd, Fort Worth, TX - Monte Coon (817) 696-2003
Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14017806 06/01/21 10:01 PM
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Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018076 06/02/21 02:02 AM
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I did this on a wet transom in a Nitro 896nearly 20 years ago. Sold the boat a couple years ago and it's still going strong.

Once rot gets a toehold in wood it is difficult to cure completely--- it is like a cancer. Digging out the rotted wood will still leave spores and water in the sound wood. After you fill in the cavity with something like epoxy, the rot continues to flourish underneath. Products promoted to make rotted wood sound and stop rot penetrate only until they meet water, with which they do not mix. Under the solid repair rotting goes on. With one exception (more later), the commercial products sold to treat dry wood to prevent rot are completely ineffective against established rot in wet wood because they are dissolved in petroleum solvents and oil and water do not mix.

There are two commonly available inexpensive materials that will kill rot in wood and prevent its recurrence. First, there are borates (borax-boric acid mixtures) which have an established record in preventing rot in new wood and in killing rot organisms and wood-destroying insects in infested wood. Second, there is ethylene glycol, most readily available as auto antifreeze-coolant. Glycol is toxic to the whole spectrum of organisms from staphylococcus bacteria to mammals. All of the published material on its effectiveness against wood-destroying fungi and insects that I am aware of is the result of my investigations over the past 15 years.

Both borate solutions and glycol penetrate dry and wet wood well because they are water-soluble; in fact, penetration by glycol is especially helped by its extreme hygroscopicity-its strong attraction for water. For both, the fact that they are water-soluble means they are not permanent solutions to rot in wood that is contnually exposed to water-below the waterline and in ground-where they will eventually be extracted-dissolved out.

I first was interested in glycol as a wood-stabilizing agent, where it is in many ways superior to polethylene glycol (PEG), and it was during this work that I realized the useful effect of glycol on organisms, though I was pretty dense in interpreting the first experiment.

The ladies immerse the stems of greenery such as magnolia branches in glycerin to keep them green. Glycol is very similar to glycerin in all its physical properties and much cheaper, so I stuck a magnolia branch in antifreeze. The next day it was brown. After the third attempt I tumbled to the fact that the glycol was killing the greenery.

This was the reason that glycol never replaced glycerin in applications such as a humectant for tobacco and an ingredient of cosmetics and pharmaceutical ointments, though it had all the desirable physical properties.

I had two 2" thick slabs of a 14" diameter hickory tree that had just been cut. I treated one with antifreeze and left one untreated. I was looking at wood stabilization, not rot prevention. After about six months stored inside my shop the untreated control was not only cracked apart, but it was sporting a great fungal growth, while the treated slab was clean.

The local history museum wanted to exhibit two "turpentine trees", longleaf pines that had many years ago been gashed to harvest the sap that made everything from turpentine to pine tar. The trees delivered to us after cutting were infested with various beetles and had some fungal growth. I treated them with antifreeze outside under a plastic tarpaulin every few days for three weeks. They were then free of insects and fungus and have remained so after being moved inside and installed in an exhibit over four years ago.

I took three pieces from a rotting dock float that were covered with a heavy growth of fungus, lichens, etc. I treated one with antifreeze painted on with a brush, the second with a water solution containing 23% borates (as B2O3), and left the third untreated as a control. They were left exposed outdoors and were rained on the first night. By the next morning the growth on the antifreeze-treated piece was definitely browning and the borate-treated piece showed slight browning. After two months exposure to the weather the growth was dead on the antifreeze- and borate-treated pieces and flourishing on the control.

I have a simple flat-bottomed skiff built of plywood and white pine, which has little resistance to rot. After ten years some rot developed in one of the frames. It may have begun in the exposed end grain. It consumed the side frame, part of the bottom frame, and part of a seat brace fastened to the side frame. The plywood gusset joining the side frame to the bottom frame was not attacked. I excised the rotted wood, saturated all with ethylene glycol antifreeze to kill all the rot organisms, and there has been no further deterioration in four more years afloat with wet bilges. I have not replaced any pieces, as I am building another boat that can replace it; that is more fun, anyway.

I have a 60+ year old case of the fungus infection known as "athlete's foot". Many years ago it infected the toenails extensively. The whole thing was pretty grotesque. My dermatologist and druggist both assured me there is no known cure. About six years ago I started using antifreeze applied under the nails with a medicine dropper about every five days. The professionals are technically right. I have not completely cured it, but the nails have grown out pink and thinned almost to the ends and I never have any trouble with blistering, peeling, or itching between the toes as I had had for six decades. No drug company is going to have any interest in this because the information has been in the public domain for so long that there is no opportunity for any proprietary advantage. The various wood-rotting organisms cannot be anywhere near as tough.

Glycol by itself has one big advantage over solutions of borates in either water or glycol. Glycol pentrates rapidly through all paint, varnish, and oil finishes (except epoxy and polyurethanes) without lifting or damaging those finishes in any way. You can treat all of the wood of your boat without removing any finish. The dyes in glycol antifreeze are so weak that they do not discolor even white woods. Once bare wood has been treated with glycol or the borate solutions and become dry to the touch it can be finished or glued. If a borate solution leaves white residues on the surface, it will have to be washed off with water and the surface allowed to dry.

This is my preferred process to treat rot. Once you find soft wood or other evidence of rot, soak it with antifreeze even if you cannot do anything else at the moment. Paint it on or spray it on with a coarse spray. Avoid fine mistlike spraying because it increases the likelihood that you will breathe in unhealthy amounts of glycol. Put it on surfaces well away from the really damaged wood, too. Use glycol lavishly on the suspect wood, which will readily absorb 10-20% of its weight of antifreeze.

Next dig out wood that is rotted enough to be weak. Add more glycol to wet the exposed wood thoroughly. Then add the 25% borate solution of the recipe below so long as it will soak in in no more than 2-3 hours. Then fill in the void with epoxy putty and/or a piece of sound treated wood as required. The reasons I use borates at all are: 1) it is a belt-and-suspenders approach to a virulent attack, and 2) over a long period glycol will evaporate from the wood; especially, in areas exposed directly to the sun and the high temperatures that result.

If there is any question about water extracting the glycol or the borates, you can retreat periodically with glycol on any surface, painted or bare, and with borate solutions on bare wood.

Glycol's toxicity to humans is low enough that it has to be deliberately ingested (about a half cup for a 150 lb. human); many millions of gallons are used annually with few precautions and without incident. It should not be left where children or pets can get at it, as smaller doses would harm them, and they may be attracted by its reported sweet taste that I have confirmed by accident. The lethal dose of borates is smaller than of glycol, but the bitter taste makes accidental consumption less likely.


Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018134 06/02/21 03:11 AM
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huh ...

I would tear it all out and replace with composite or if you want to go the easier route seacast pour

Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018144 06/02/21 03:15 AM
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Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018192 06/02/21 03:51 AM
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Longest freaking post I've ever seen.......champions are famous for being able to dry out the transom and it be fine......heat lamp and fans until it is done.....look it up


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Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018195 06/02/21 04:04 AM
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How bad is it? Nasty looking water running out of the hole and a big soft spot? Just a little drip but sounds solid? If it isn't to bad you can put heat lamps on it for around 4 weeks and dry it put and seal everything up good. I really suggest going to BBC and looking thru the champion section. Lots of knowledge there about this subject

Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018223 06/02/21 04:58 AM
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Aren't Champions after year 2000 no-wood composite transom Champions? Not that almost any material can get waterlogged. And can be dried.

If the strength is compromised there's lots of info on hollowing the transom and putting Seacast in it.

If you want a shop to look at it I'd take it to Toledo Fiberglass and just get a Gorilla Hull put on it while your there. It'll all be lifetime warrantied.


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Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018249 06/02/21 10:12 AM
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call classic fiberglass and talk to chris.

you should be able to dry that one out easy enough, shouldn't have wood in it.

I redid the transom on my 82 184 with seacast and it was solid as a rock after, 2002 will be a different deal due to construction methods and finished product being a lot different.

https://www.classic-fiberglass.com/


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Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018258 06/02/21 10:42 AM
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Classic Fiberglass in Sanger


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Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018480 06/02/21 02:50 PM
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Johnson's Fiberglass in Burleson


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Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: BassKicker74] #14018605 06/02/21 05:05 PM
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Originally Posted by BassKicker74
Johnson's Fiberglass in Burleson



I have been trying to remember the name above, since I read the OP yesterday, just couldn’t recall it. Many Champion guys recommended them to me, I ended up not needing them, my issue was a bit different.

Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018726 06/02/21 06:47 PM
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Here's a great group on BassBoatCentral - http://www.bbcboards.net/forumdisplay.php?f=35


Steve
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Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: ccolt01] #14018864 06/02/21 08:50 PM
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Classic Fiberglass and talk to Chris.


Tony Lumpkins
Re: 2002 Champion 203 Transom Issues [Re: SRitchey] #14019005 06/02/21 11:49 PM
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Originally Posted by SRitchey
Here's a great group on BassBoatCentral - http://www.bbcboards.net/forumdisplay.php?f=35


Traitor... Dan whip


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