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Jan 23rd, 2013
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Line Types #13532274 04/24/20 03:41 AM
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I am looking to re-line my 2 fly reels and at looking at the line I see floating and just flyline.

I would like one reels to let the line sink and the other with floating. when I look at I think all of them they are weight-forward even the floating.

What is the difference??

Thanks


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Re: Line Types [Re: Super8mm] #13532291 04/24/20 03:57 AM
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The most common fly line out there is the weight forward floating line. I would bet it is what is on 90+% of all fly reels. The other three main types of lines are sink tips, intermediate and full sink fly lines. I am far from an expert and I am sure others can add more information, but here is a general rundown:

Sink tips are exactly what they sound like. The last 8-20 or so feet of the line will sink (4-8 inches per second) but the remainder is a floating line. I like these lines for fishing rivers. They work very well for throwing big streamers like gamechangers and some of the big Kelly Galloup streamers that you want to fish sub surface but don't have any weight added. The line allows the fly to get down but still be pretty much neutrally buoyant so it acts more realistic, as opposed to something like a Clouser minnow which acts like a jig and sinks when not retrieved. I use an Orvis Bank Shot Sink Tip for throwing big streamers and have a lot of luck.

Intermediate fly lines and full sink fly lines both are sinking lines, the main difference is the intermediate line sinks very slowly (1-2 inches per second) while the full sink line sinks much quicker (6+ inches per second). I have no experience with either of these lines but I know a lot of people who fish the surf use intermediate lines to get the fly down below the surface of the waves, while full sink lines are popular with people fishing lakes when they need to get down deep.

One more thing you see is differences in how heavy the front of a line will be. For instance, on my 4 weight I have a regular weight forward floating line, but on my 8 weight I have a weight forward floating line that is designed for throwing heavier flies so the front 30 or so feet is heavier than normal so it loads up well with those big flies. So while they are both weight forward floaters, they are far from the same line. The Orvis Bank Shot Sink Tip line I use is 2 or 3 times heavier for the front portion, so I throw the 6 weight line on my 8 weight with no issues at all.

There are other types as well such as double taper floating lines, but the lines listed above are what you generally see.

Re: Line Types [Re: Super8mm] #13532311 04/24/20 04:35 AM
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Thanks McKinneyLonghorn, that helps. there are times that I want the fly to stay floating but they seem to sink after about 5 cast and I thought maybe the floating line would help it a bit more.


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Re: Line Types [Re: Super8mm] #13532328 04/24/20 06:38 AM
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Isn’t there floatant made to help a fly stay afloat? I think dry fly fishing folks almost always apply some product to the leader and tippet and fly to keep it on the surface. Gink and gasoline was the thing wasn’t it?

https://www.murraysflyshop.com/pages/which-dry-fly-floatant-works-the-best-a-comparison-test

Re: Line Types [Re: karstopo] #13532384 04/24/20 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by karstopo
Isn’t there floatant made to help a fly stay afloat? I think dry fly fishing folks almost always apply some product to the leader and tippet and fly to keep it on the surface. Gink and gasoline was the thing wasn’t it?


Thanks, interesting read. I might see if i can find some Scientific Anglers to try. smile


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Re: Line Types [Re: Super8mm] #13532819 04/24/20 04:36 PM
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Floating, full sink, and sink tip are self explanatory. If a line doesn't specify, the default will be floating. Most folks I know that use a sinking line, have a specific application they use it for. They have it on its own rod and rigged with a certain fly, sort of like a bass fisherman that keeps a 2nd rod with a buzz bait for when he sees a fish jump. Personally, I'd use a flouro leader or a tiny split weight before I used sink tip or sinking fly line.

Weight forward (WF) deals with the way a line is balanced and casts. The alternative is tapered, or double tapered. WF lines are built up towards the leader end of the line. Even with the naked eye you can see the line gets thicker in the last 10-12 ft, and then tapers back down right at the leader loop. Beginning fly fishermen will appreciate WF lines as they help load up the rod and make it easier to cast. They also help to turn over larger weighted flies. But that weight comes at the expense of precision and delicacy. You will be less accurate, and it will hit the water harder.

Tapered lines taper down evenly for about the last 20 ft into the leader. Double taper is tapered on both ends so the line can be reversed to extend the life. These lines are great for delicate and precision presentations to picky fish.

If you are fishing for trout in streams, I'd go with a DT floating line. If you are fishing in TX for bass, or in the salt you'll want the WF to turn over your larger flies.


Re: Line Types [Re: COFF] #13533100 04/24/20 07:38 PM
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Thanks for the info COFF very good breakdown.

I only fish around North Texas and sometimes around Wichita KS when I go see my kids and just from the bank. My 2 rods are 9’ and one 4 wt and one 5 wt, I normally only use small dry flies and catch hand sized perch and fingerling LM bass. There have been a couple of times that I had something take the fly and made a run and broke off my 2# tippet where it sounded like a .22 rifle shot “LOL”

Now with my kayak I hope to step thing up a bit


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Re: Line Types [Re: Super8mm] #13533121 04/24/20 07:50 PM
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To add to what karstopo said, if your fly is sinking then it is unlikely your fly line is at fault. Gink is probably the most well known floatant. It is important to only add Gink (and other gel floatants) to flies when they are dry. Add it before you start fishing a dry fly or foam bug and then if the fly starts to sink, you can dry it off using a dry shake product such as the Shimazaki dry shake powder. The dry shake removes all the moisture from the fly and returns it to the top of the water where it belongs. You just insert the fly into the bottle, close the lid tightly and give it a good shake. When you remove the fly blow lightly on the fly to remove the excess powder and get back to fishing.

There are other brands of both gel floatant and dry shake, but these are the two I am familiar with. They should be available at most places that sell fly fishing equipment.

Re: Line Types [Re: McKinneyLonghorn] #13533135 04/24/20 08:03 PM
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Originally Posted by McKinneyLonghorn
To add to what karstopo said, if your fly is sinking then it is unlikely your fly line is at fault.


Yes my line is bad, it is about 10 yrs old and it is no longer round, for of a wavy style form being on the reels.

I have a BP about 10 minutes away so I will probably go over monday during SR. hour and pick up a few things including line.

I am gathering up my other stuff like my PFD and making sure it and the whistle is ok and get everything in one place so I can load and go when I want to. bolt


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Re: Line Types [Re: Super8mm] #13533197 04/24/20 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Super8mm
Originally Posted by McKinneyLonghorn
To add to what karstopo said, if your fly is sinking then it is unlikely your fly line is at fault.


Yes my line is bad, it is about 10 yrs old and it is no longer round, for of a wavy style form being on the reels.

I have a BP about 10 minutes away so I will probably go over monday during SR. hour and pick up a few things including line.

I am gathering up my other stuff like my PFD and making sure it and the whistle is ok and get everything in one place so I can load and go when I want to. bolt


Gotcha. Glad I said it was "unlikely" your line was at fault instead of it "definitely" not your line's fault.

Re: Line Types [Re: McKinneyLonghorn] #13533223 04/24/20 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by McKinneyLonghorn
Originally Posted by Super8mm
[quote=McKinneyLonghorn]To add to what karstopo said, if your fly is sinking then it is unlikely your fly line is at fault.


Gotcha. Glad I said it was "unlikely" your line was at fault instead of it "definitely" not your line's fault.


That is why I figured I need some clairfication on what to replace it with, it is not very smooth in the fingers when casting it "LOL"


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