texasfishingforum.com logo
Main Menu
Advertisement
Affiliates
Advertisement
Newest Members
Walter B, Hattrck009, workn2death, Bass master04, Juju69
111788 Registered Users
Top Posters(All Time)
TexDawg 92,509
hopalong 82,990
Pilothawk 79,190
John175☮ 74,604
JDavis7873 67,397
Derek 🐝 63,472
Bigbob_FTW 61,454
Tritonman 58,822
Mark Perry 58,217
facebook
Forum Statistics
Forums60
Topics767,496
Posts9,661,489
Members111,788
Most Online36,273
Jan 23rd, 2013
Print Thread
lure choice considerations - theoretical #13377210 12/19/19 04:11 PM
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 302
S
SenkoSam Online Content OP
Angler
OP Online Content
Angler
S
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 302
I recently was wondering why skirtless tubes worked but unfortunately from a human POV and not a fish's. Not being able to do much in the cold weather, I was in the basement workshop looking at lure composites I recently made and it came to me certain lure characteristics that increase strike potential - and of which there are a million combinations. We would like to think that certain lures are far superior because they've loaded the boat without questioning why or at least applying design characteristics fish are prone to turn fish aggressive from a suspended state. Here are a few just off the top of my head:
1. lure contrast
a. This includes color brightness such as fluorescent colors that stand out like a neon sign.
b. Laminate color contrast such as a darker color on one surface/ bright color on the other; bright tail color/dark body
c. Flash to include flakes in the plastic or on it's surface; spinning flashing blades (IE in-line)

2. shape and size combos that match the potential of a fish striking
a. Sometimes less is better IE under a float; at other times increased body bulk plus length challenge a fish's territory regardless the size fish.
b. certain lure profiles are programmed into a fish's DNA - depending on the fish in a specific water, keeping in mind that there are no guarantees of universal appeal.
c. a fish's current aggressiveness that falls into a range from 1-5 determines what shapes and size fish will attack -IE pre-spawn fish in the shallow and school fish are very aggressive.

3. lure action
a. there are many that do better retrieved slowly with pauses; other do fine trolled at a medium speed but that have a bill-induced wobble (crankbaits).
b. vibration-type picked up by sonic detection merits a close inspection of what a lure looks and acts like on various retrieves which matters more than we know. The waddle of a skirtless tube or my cone tails is a perfect example of a unique action that works most of the time. My 2-2.5" wacky grub-stick is another where tip & body twitch/quiver is another that I swear by.
c. horizontal action vs vertical action are key considerations for choosing lure design and presentation. This coupled with lure speed in either direction determine a lure's success.

I've seen many lures that were outstanding in certain waters, some that were more universal in appeal. But I can only look at them from a why-did-they-work point of view and not the numbers caught. The why they caught fish is the combination of factors mentioned above which I take into consideration and consider applying to lures I choose to fish with - either premade or homemade. It's like picking a lock and being able to open a safe - one lock per different safe and discovering key components of that combination.

Theoretical combination-by-design examples:
Spoon minnow grub : subtle thin, straight tail shimmy that tickles the lateral line slowly and in place
minnow shape profile built in to a fish's DNA
dart & pause retrieve that fits the profile or suspended under a float
[Linked Image]

Wacky mini-stick grub: caterpillar / slug design/ profile,
also a DNA stored profile
body and tail quiver with or without rod tip induced action
slim profile easy to eat
action that also tickles the lateral line at any depth we choose to fish it slowly and in one part of the water column.
[Linked Image]

Crankbait:
vibration: clacking hooks, maybe rattles inside the lure, major wobble (large bill) or quick tight wobble (Rat L Trap) that smack the lateral line and induce ambush-type strikes

Fish aggression range matters as does various DNA-lure combination potentials. Not all fish hit crankbaits as often as others - the window may be much narrower. Fish caught in waters without much pressure are more apt to hit more lures having different combinations of factors. So to think that a lure is universally successful may misleading when 50 or more fish are caught in one outing. This ignores all other lures that could have done just as well.

So in conclusion, my quest is to discover specific lure combination factors-by-design that fish respond to more often than not, and not just a lure that did well without investigating the combination that induced many species and size fish to strike it.

Re: lure choice considerations - theoretical [Re: SenkoSam] #13379566 12/22/19 06:54 AM
Joined: Dec 2019
Posts: 6
N
NJBass Offline
Green Horn
Offline
Green Horn
N
Joined: Dec 2019
Posts: 6
Scents work. The problem is that most are oil or to oily. I use what I call stinky string but its not that stinky and its dry. Its specific amino acids, other proteins and a tiny bit of oil. Stinky string alone on a hook catches more fish than many lures that I've had. The pic shows it looped around the hook but it can also be hooked or tied, or tied like a bow.

Attached Files 20191222_014108~2.jpg20191222_015211~2.jpg
Re: lure choice considerations - theoretical [Re: SenkoSam] #13379571 12/22/19 10:17 AM
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 302
S
SenkoSam Online Content OP
Angler
OP Online Content
Angler
S
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 302
It amazes me fish strike those ! Goes to show you that lures don't need to be pretty, nor match the appearance of a prey animal to catch fish. I'm not into scent but I wouldn't discount it as a reason fish attack them being that it's relates to the senses. Though if I had to guess the reason for their success, it would be the action tail of the grub and the spinner blade and tail feather action of the one on the right. Scent and color IMO are secondary considerations.

You've discovered a set of lure components that in combination are in contrast with a fish's environment and provoke sense-related attacks.

Nice going !

Last edited by SenkoSam; 12/22/19 10:20 AM.
Re: lure choice considerations - theoretical [Re: SenkoSam] #13379754 12/22/19 04:43 PM
Joined: Dec 2019
Posts: 6
N
NJBass Offline
Green Horn
Offline
Green Horn
N
Joined: Dec 2019
Posts: 6
I always thought that you have to get the fish's attention first. Flash, movement, vibration, ect. I remember reading that Bass only see two colors red and green. At depths those colors look black. Black and white are not colors.

Nothing on the fishing market flashes like these crystals. They flash the 7 colors of the rainbow but no matter what color they flash. They also flash UV light that penetrates murky water. A multitude of sharp, bright, long distance flashes in all directions up down, right, left, front and back. They get noticed. The stinky string gets them to bite. It smells and tastes like food.

There are plenty of videos on YouTube of many different game fish following lures but not hitting them. There are plenty of videos of bass inhaling numerous types of lures and spitting them out just as fast. The lure gets their attention but it doesn't taste like food. If you don't feel the hit and quickly set the hook you miss fish.

Re: lure choice considerations - theoretical [Re: SenkoSam] #13380484 12/23/19 01:45 AM
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 302
S
SenkoSam Online Content OP
Angler
OP Online Content
Angler
S
Joined: Sep 2003
Posts: 302
Quote
I always thought that you have to get the fish's attention first. Flash, movement, vibration, ect.

Nice observation.

That same idea came to me this afternoon - you gotta get their attention and then hold it long enough to let the lure's action push its buttons so it strikes.
Unlike some lure companies and a few anglers who post on forums would insist, there are more than just a chosen few lures that can accomplish the above - ANYTIME!
It simply comes down to the combination we choose.

I forgot to mention that a part of the combination must include angler input using the best hand/wrist action, reel speed and presentation that complements a particular lure design that makes it effective. If a lure is used incorrectly, it could be the best one ever and yet snubbed by fish. Each of the lures below have different ways of using them that make them eye catchers and strike provokers due to each's unique action and size:
[Linked Image]

The Sweet Beaver mod I would use on bottom, allowing the bulky body and flapping tails to get the job done.Bass and catfish I expect would strike it - not panfish.

The three sticks -bottom left - can be rigged wacky and regular. Both rigs can be used anywhere in the water column due to a body quiver or body whip action using a slow retrieve.

The smallest grub with the thick butt is rigged the regular way using a light jig. It has a unique bob & weave action of a boxer and gets hit by all species.

The grub-worms that have the tail of a Kut Tail Worm or copy of it, have a unique whip action that quivers and wags on the pause - one of my greatest discoveries in the last few years.

The white hair jig (my dog's hair) is the most finesse action lure there is except feather and breathes and pulsates with the least action applied. It's works with slow retrieves or when used under a float.

A good combination is no different than that of a lock or a boxer in that it never changes and always works more often than not in the right place and time. Pro anglers understand the importance of combinations and excel using them once fish are located, but so can anyone - even a newbie just starting out.

Last edited by SenkoSam; 12/27/19 10:08 AM.
Previous Thread
Index
Next Thread


© 1998-2019 OUTDOOR SITES NETWORK all rights reserved USA and Worldwide
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3