texasfishingforum.com logo
Main Menu
Advertisement
Affiliates
Advertisement
Newest Members
Tecman, Kolton12211993, TFonzy, Fisher6969, Wxzy
113772 Registered Users
Top Posters(All Time)
TexDawg 97,104
hopalong 89,764
Pilothawk 80,193
John175☮ 77,777
JDavis7873 67,400
Bigbob_FTW 67,160
Derek 🐝 64,941
Mark Perry 60,726
Tritonman 58,986
facebook
Forum Statistics
Forums62
Topics780,611
Posts9,905,110
Members113,772
Most Online36,273
Jan 23rd, 2013
Print Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3
Nitrogen in Tires #13358757 12/02/19 02:32 AM
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 6,836
R
Rayzor Offline OP
TFF Celebrity
OP Offline
TFF Celebrity
R
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 6,836
With the recent cold weather, my TPI sensors have gone haywire. I am sure a lot of other car owners experience the same thing. On cold mornings, the low pressure alert comes on and says all of my tires are low. From what I understand, one of the reasons (if not the only one) they put nitrogen in new car tires is that this gas doesn't fluctuate in pressure like oxygen. So, I got on the phone and called several tire shops. Neither NTB, Pep Boys or Discount Tire has any. Where the heck do you get this stuff?


Be safe,
Rayzor
[Linked Image]
2001 Triton Tx-21/225 Mercury EFI
Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Rayzor] #13358890 12/02/19 05:15 AM
Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,342
doctorxring Offline
Extreme Angler
Offline
Extreme Angler
Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,342

Both nitrogen and oxygen pressures respond to temperature change. Roughly 1 psi for every 10 degrees temp change. Read this article about this issue.

Bottom line — Check your tires psi with a good pressure gauge once every week or two and you will be good.
Pure nitrogen is pretty much just something to sell. Minimal benefit.

https://www.edmunds.com/car-buying/should-you-fill-your-cars-tires-with-nitrogen.html


.

Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Rayzor] #13359098 12/02/19 02:54 PM
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 468
R
Ranger 177 Online Content
Angler
Online Content
Angler
R
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 468
Costco tire center has it. Also car dealerships

Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Ranger 177] #13360248 12/03/19 06:46 PM
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 10,057
S
Stump jumper Offline
TFF Guru
Offline
TFF Guru
S
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 10,057
Originally Posted by Ranger 177
Costco tire center has it. Also car dealerships

yep, Stealerships love to rip people off with nitrogen for $200. I refuse to pay it. I negotiate my best deal and when they try to add it I say take it off or I walk. It is just one of their worthless add ons to pad their bottom line. They will try to feed you full of all kinds of BS to get the money out of your pocket. Just air your tires up to the proper inflation numbers when cold and reset the TPMS if you have to. My sensors are set at 46 lbs because I am running BFG KO2s. I deal with this normally with the first cold snap. I have to wonder about the process of filling tires with nitrogen. Do they suck all the air and create a vacuum? If not you are getting a mixture of regular air and nitrogen.


2200 Bay Champ/200 Mercury Optimax
2017 Tundra TSS 4x4 Crewmax 5.7L
Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: doctorxring] #13361046 12/04/19 02:46 PM
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,221
HARD WORKN HAROLD Offline
Extreme Angler
Offline
Extreme Angler
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,221
Originally Posted by doctorxring

Both nitrogen and oxygen pressures respond to temperature change. Roughly 1 psi for every 10 degrees temp change. Read this article about this issue.

Bottom line — Check your tires psi with a good pressure gauge once every week or two and you will be good.
Pure nitrogen is pretty much just something to sell. Minimal benefit.

https://www.edmunds.com/car-buying/should-you-fill-your-cars-tires-with-nitrogen.html


.

Nitrogen is not affected by temperature changes. It is an inert gas, that's why it is used exclusively in airplane tires. As far as car or trailer tires, use compressed air.


DON'T LET THE CLOTHES FOOL YA
Life is too short to fish with a dead crickett!
Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: HARD WORKN HAROLD] #13361300 12/04/19 06:33 PM
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 10,057
S
Stump jumper Offline
TFF Guru
Offline
TFF Guru
S
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 10,057
Originally Posted by HARD WORKN HAROLD
Originally Posted by doctorxring

Both nitrogen and oxygen pressures respond to temperature change. Roughly 1 psi for every 10 degrees temp change. Read this article about this issue.

Bottom line — Check your tires psi with a good pressure gauge once every week or two and you will be good.
Pure nitrogen is pretty much just something to sell. Minimal benefit.

https://www.edmunds.com/car-buying/should-you-fill-your-cars-tires-with-nitrogen.html


.

Nitrogen is not affected by temperature changes. It is an inert gas, that's why it is used exclusively in airplane tires. As far as car or trailer tires, use compressed air.

yep, we are not landing jets. I wonder how much money has been made up selling folks on nitrogen. One time I just let the sales dude rattle on about the benefits and wen he finished I just insisted that he remove the charge. Reply was "but we put it in all of our tires". I said I don't give a rat's behind what you do but I am not paying for it.


2200 Bay Champ/200 Mercury Optimax
2017 Tundra TSS 4x4 Crewmax 5.7L
Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Stump jumper] #13361324 12/04/19 06:59 PM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 2
P
pbft1 Offline
Green Horn
Offline
Green Horn
P
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 2
Ambient air composition.....78% nitrogen...21% oxygen....MONEY GRAB!!!!!

Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Rayzor] #13361432 12/04/19 08:55 PM
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 13,816
C
COFF Offline
TFF Guru
Offline
TFF Guru
C
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 13,816
The Costco in Plano has it outside their tire center. It is free, and it is self service. Just screw it on to your tire, set the pressure you want and let it run.


Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: COFF] #13361514 12/04/19 10:19 PM
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 10,057
S
Stump jumper Offline
TFF Guru
Offline
TFF Guru
S
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 10,057
Originally Posted by COFF
The Costco in Plano has it outside their tire center. It is free, and it is self service. Just screw it on to your tire, set the pressure you want and let it run.

So does it suck the air out and replace with nitrogen? Is it free to non members?


2200 Bay Champ/200 Mercury Optimax
2017 Tundra TSS 4x4 Crewmax 5.7L
Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Rayzor] #13361574 12/04/19 11:29 PM
Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 313
R
rsmith Offline
Angler
Offline
Angler
R
Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 313

Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Rayzor] #13362351 12/05/19 09:12 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 1,819
J
Jeff From Iowa Online Content
Extreme Angler
Online Content
Extreme Angler
J
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 1,819
Originally Posted by Rayzor
With the recent cold weather, my TPI sensors have gone haywire. I am sure a lot of other car owners experience the same thing. On cold mornings, the low pressure alert comes on and says all of my tires are low. From what I understand, one of the reasons (if not the only one) they put nitrogen in new car tires is that this gas doesn't fluctuate in pressure like oxygen. So, I got on the phone and called several tire shops. Neither NTB, Pep Boys or Discount Tire has any. Where the heck do you get this stuff?



They havent gone hay wire you just need to add air. Your probably gaining 2-3 psi when you drive and warm them up turning off the tpms making you think they are bad when on again in the am.

Last edited by Jeff From Iowa; 12/05/19 09:13 PM.

Dont try and take someones shine away..... Doing so just shows YOUR weak character.
Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Rayzor] #13365620 12/08/19 11:04 PM
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,045
S
Slow Drifter Online Content
Extreme Angler
Online Content
Extreme Angler
S
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,045
Originally Posted by Rayzor
With the recent cold weather, my TPI sensors have gone haywire. I am sure a lot of other car owners experience the same thing. On cold mornings, the low pressure alert comes on and says all of my tires are low. From what I understand, one of the reasons (if not the only one) they put nitrogen in new car tires is that this gas doesn't fluctuate in pressure like oxygen. So, I got on the phone and called several tire shops. Neither NTB, Pep Boys or Discount Tire has any. Where the heck do you get this stuff?


What did you do before we had TPI sensors? Yeah....do that.


SD

[Linked Image]
Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Rayzor] #13371543 12/13/19 06:12 PM
Joined: May 2003
Posts: 2,728
M
mstring Offline
Extreme Angler
Offline
Extreme Angler
M
Joined: May 2003
Posts: 2,728
When I bought my truck they tried to stick me with paying for that, told them no and threatened to walk. They took the charge off. I had a flat that had to be patched, so I have one tire with just normal air. According to the pressure monitor I can tell which one it is on cold mornings even after several rotations. That one is usually 3-4 psi lower than the others but comes up to the same after a little driving.

Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: Rayzor] #13371643 12/13/19 07:44 PM
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 6,889
BlueNitro Offline
TFF Celebrity
Offline
TFF Celebrity
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 6,889
I work in the Semiconductor industry so let me give you a little insight to using N2 in tires. It's not the N2 or any other gas used to fill the tire but it is the amount of moisture in the gas that makes the difference. The reason that N2 is used is that it is the highest % of gas in the air we breathe so it is cheaper to extract by volume. When they do the separation in the cold box, the process also removes a considerable amount of moisture at the same time. Then depending on the moisture content desired (PPMv or PPBv), they will remove additional moisture via purification of some sort (heated, nickel getter, etc.).

Most tire shop air compressors will have a moisture content of 10 ppm to 25 ppm and then add in all the moisture they add when they mount a tire, so you do have a lot of moisture in your tires.

In the tire, the moisture will either expand or contract depending on the temperature changes (this is where the 10+ ppm compared to the 1 ppm moisture content comes into play). Cold mornings, that is why the pressure is lower. Roll down the road and the tire temp heats up (friction) and the pressure raises. Simple physics.

When using N2 with a moisture content of less than 1 PPM, there are less of the temperature/pressure swings happening in your tire which will affect your MPG's as well as tire wear. Little known fact - the reason that they fill a passenger tire to 32 psig is because they know that the tire pressure will increase as you drive so they fill it at less than the desired operating pressure of the tire and hope it comes close to that pressure based on your driving habits and other contributing factors. This is the biggest issue as far as tire wear, safety and MPG's because they are purposely under inflating your tires.

Drive around on a cold morning/short trip and note your MPG's and then do the same on a warm afternoon and you will see a significant improvement in MPG's with the tire at a higher pressure. Now imagine that you didn't have moisture in your tires creating these pressure fluctuations and you could set the pressure of the tire for the best MPG's and wear characteristics (let's assume 40 psig) for your tires. Let's assume that you get 20 MPG's in your vehicle and 2 MPG's better with a constant tire pressure and you drive 10,000 miles a year, you will buy 500 gallons (20 mpg) compared to 454 gallons (22 mpg) of gas which at $2.25 per gallon average is $115 in savings per year (BTW - mine is closer to 3 mpg in my Jeep Grand Cherokee and 2.25 in my Tundra but the math was easier at 2 mpg).

Speaking or tires lasting longer, you will have less wear on your sidewalls (under inflation), corrosion of the steel belts internally and the decomposition of the rubber internally and finally the road contact surface is more consistent so your thread wears more evenly. So if I get another 6 months to a year out of a set of tires, that is a huge savings.

So now that $200 that you wouldn't spend based on ignorance is costing you a lot more money in additional gas and the tires wearing out quicker.

So yes, I have N2 in my Jeep, Tundra, wife's Explorer and tandem axle boat trailer. I feel I save a lot more money by having them filled with N2 over the 10 years that I have done it and been watching the cost comparison between N2 and not using N2 but the biggest plus is that I am less likely to have a tire failure such as a blowout at highway speeds which is worth more to me than $200 dollars.

It also helps that I have a 10,000 gallon liquid N2 tank out back at work that is around 0.5 PPM/500 PPB and have vacuum pumps to extract the moisture they use when they mount a tire (bet you didn't know that is what costs the most and is important to do before your fill it up with the nitrogen).

And if it's good enough for NASA and Nascar, it's good enough for me. Heck, some people even call me 'BlueNitrogen'.


LiftSaver Trolling Motor Mounting Bracket - Patent Pending and LiftSaver Transducer Pole Mount
www.liftsavertmmount.com
[Linked Image][Linked Image]
Works with MG Xi5, Xi3 and MK Terrova, Ulterra, PD V2 and Riptides as well.

Re: Nitrogen in Tires [Re: BlueNitro] #13371709 12/13/19 08:55 PM
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,626
G
gander Offline
Extreme Angler
Offline
Extreme Angler
G
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,626
Originally Posted by BlueNitro
I work in the Semiconductor industry so let me give you a little insight to using N2 in tires. It's not the N2 or any other gas used to fill the tire but it is the amount of moisture in the gas that makes the difference. The reason that N2 is used is that it is the highest % of gas in the air we breathe so it is cheaper to extract by volume. When they do the separation in the cold box, the process also removes a considerable amount of moisture at the same time. Then depending on the moisture content desired (PPMv or PPBv), they will remove additional moisture via purification of some sort (heated, nickel getter, etc.).

Most tire shop air compressors will have a moisture content of 10 ppm to 25 ppm and then add in all the moisture they add when they mount a tire, so you do have a lot of moisture in your tires.

In the tire, the moisture will either expand or contract depending on the temperature changes (this is where the 10+ ppm compared to the 1 ppm moisture content comes into play). Cold mornings, that is why the pressure is lower. Roll down the road and the tire temp heats up (friction) and the pressure raises. Simple physics.

When using N2 with a moisture content of less than 1 PPM, there are less of the temperature/pressure swings happening in your tire which will affect your MPG's as well as tire wear. Little known fact - the reason that they fill a passenger tire to 32 psig is because they know that the tire pressure will increase as you drive so they fill it at less than the desired operating pressure of the tire and hope it comes close to that pressure based on your driving habits and other contributing factors. This is the biggest issue as far as tire wear, safety and MPG's because they are purposely under inflating your tires.

Drive around on a cold morning/short trip and note your MPG's and then do the same on a warm afternoon and you will see a significant improvement in MPG's with the tire at a higher pressure. Now imagine that you didn't have moisture in your tires creating these pressure fluctuations and you could set the pressure of the tire for the best MPG's and wear characteristics (let's assume 40 psig) for your tires. Let's assume that you get 20 MPG's in your vehicle and 2 MPG's better with a constant tire pressure and you drive 10,000 miles a year, you will buy 500 gallons (20 mpg) compared to 454 gallons (22 mpg) of gas which at $2.25 per gallon average is $115 in savings per year (BTW - mine is closer to 3 mpg in my Jeep Grand Cherokee and 2.25 in my Tundra but the math was easier at 2 mpg).

Speaking or tires lasting longer, you will have less wear on your sidewalls (under inflation), corrosion of the steel belts internally and the decomposition of the rubber internally and finally the road contact surface is more consistent so your thread wears more evenly. So if I get another 6 months to a year out of a set of tires, that is a huge savings.

So now that $200 that you wouldn't spend based on ignorance is costing you a lot more money in additional gas and the tires wearing out quicker.

So yes, I have N2 in my Jeep, Tundra, wife's Explorer and tandem axle boat trailer. I feel I save a lot more money by having them filled with N2 over the 10 years that I have done it and been watching the cost comparison between N2 and not using N2 but the biggest plus is that I am less likely to have a tire failure such as a blowout at highway speeds which is worth more to me than $200 dollars.

It also helps that I have a 10,000 gallon liquid N2 tank out back at work that is around 0.5 PPM/500 PPB and have vacuum pumps to extract the moisture they use when they mount a tire (bet you didn't know that is what costs the most and is important to do before your fill it up with the nitrogen).

And if it's good enough for NASA and Nascar, it's good enough for me. Heck, some people even call me 'BlueNitrogen'.
Interesting...thanks

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3
Previous Thread
Index
Next Thread


© 1998-2019 OUTDOOR SITES NETWORK all rights reserved USA and Worldwide
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3