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Jan 23rd, 2013
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CABO SAN LUCAS FISHING REPORT SEPT 9TH #13276425 09/10/19 05:23 PM
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 363
J
jcsportfishing Offline OP
Angler
OP Offline
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J
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 363
JC SPORTFISHING WEEKLY FISHING REPORT
As The Admiral Seas It
Fishing Report: 09/02/19 TO 09/08/19
Stop By Our Office for up to Date Fishing Report

MARLIN: GOOD MARLIN FISHING ALL WEEK FOR SMALL BLUES, AND STRIPED MARLIN FROM THE 95 TO THE 180. THEY ARE BITING ON LURES AND ON LIVE PITCHED BAIT, ON THE SURFACE.

TUNA: A FEW SMALL FOOTBALL SIZED YELLOWFIN, FROM LOS ARCOS TO THE JAIME AND GOLDEN GATE BANKS. THEY ARE BITING ON LIVE SARDINES AND KINGBUSTERS, THERE ARE A FEW BITING ON CEDAR PLUGS. [Linked Image]


DORADO: NICE DORADO ARE BEING CAUGHT EVERYDAY CLOSE TO SHORE FROM GREY ROCK, TO THE 95 SPOT AND ON THE PACIFIC SIDE FROM THE LIGHTHOUSE TO LOS ARCOS. THEY ARE BITING ON LIVE BAIT, DEAD, BAIT, AND LURES.

WAHOO: WAHOO BITE IS STARTING TO PICK UP, THERE ARE A FEW BITES ON LURES. HAVE TO TROLL WITH FEATHERS, AND RAPALAS.

INSHORE FISHING: THERE ARE SOME NICE WHITE BONITA BITING INSHORE ON SARDINES, A FEW DORADO INSHORE, AND SOME SKIPJACKS CAUGHT ON LIGHT TACKLE FOR FUN.

Jc Sportfishing Charters is a family owned and operated business and has been fishing in Cabo San Lucas for the past 25 years. Jerry, explains that his charter business is geared more for families and novice anglers, making sure everyone who charters a boat with him have a great time and lots of fun. We welcome families, and groups. We want everyone who fishes with us to take all the sites in and have a memorable experience. This is what is most important to us. We have and do a few tournaments each year and can cater to fisherman who might be interested in tournament fishing.

STOP BY JC SPORTFISHING FOR UP TO THE MINUTE FISHING REPORT.

BEWARE:
Please beware of the guys in the street selling boat charters. If you wait till the day you are fishing and go to the dock where your boat is many times people will mislead you to another boat or dock trying to put you on a boat that was not meant for you. You need to have a person guide you to your boat, who is from a reputable charter company. This way there is no confusion or misleading. Please remember when renting Sport fishing boats in Cabo that you rent your boat from reputable and established business. Walk into a fishing fleet office and ask questions about what you are getting and what are the costs? You don’t want to rent boats from vendors in the streets and you do not want to book through shady websites offering you the world. Check through travel forums about reputable fishing fleets to deal with. Look for testimonials about the fleet your booking, your charter with. Ask about what will the boat be supplying? Will it include beverages or lunches? How much does it cost to fillet your catch? Check to see if charter boat is insured? Ask about getting your catch smoked? Check cost of a fishing license. These are just a few things to consider when booking your charter boat. We will be talking more about this in the next weeks fishing report. Until next time good fishing and we hope to see you in Cabo soon. Come by the office here in Cabo and get all the latest up to date fishing report.
http://www.tempbreak.com/index.php?&cwregion=cb

YELLOWFIN TUNA:The yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) is a species of tuna found in pelagic waters of tropical and subtropical oceans worldwide.

Yellowfin is often marketed as ahi, from the Hawaiian ʻahi, a name also used there for the closely related bigeye tuna. The species name, albacares ("white meat") can also lead to confusion: in English, the albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) is a different species, while yellowfin is officially designated albacore in French and referred to as albacora by Portuguese fishermen.

The yellowfin tuna is among the larger tuna species, reaching weights over 180 kg (400 lb), but is significantly smaller than the Atlantic and Pacific bluefin tunas, which can reach over 450 kg (990 lb), and slightly smaller than the bigeye tuna and the southern bluefin tuna.

The second dorsal fin and the anal fin, as well as the finlets between those fins and the tail, are bright yellow, giving this fish its common name. The second dorsal and anal fins can be very long in mature specimens, reaching almost as far back as the tail and giving the appearance of sickles or scimitars. The pectoral fins are also longer than the related bluefin tuna, but not as long as those of the albacore. The main body is a very dark metallic blue, changing to silver on the belly, which has about 20 vertical lines.

Reported sizes in the literature have ranged as high as 2.4 m (94 in) in length and 200 kg (440 lb) in weight. In 2012, a fisherman in Baja California caught a 193-kg yellowfin. If the catch is confirmed by the IGFA, the fisherman will receive a prize of $1 million.

Yellowfin tuna are epipelagic fish that inhabit the mixed surface layer of the ocean above the thermocline. Sonic tracking has found that although yellowfin tuna, unlike the related bigeye tuna, mostly range in the top 100 m (330 ft) of the water column and penetrate the thermocline relatively infrequently, they are capable of diving to considerable depths. An individual tagged in the Indian Ocean with an archival tag spent 85% of its time in depths shallower than 75 m (246 ft), but was recorded as having made three dives to 578, 982, and 1,160 m (3,810 ft).

Although mainly found in deep offshore waters, yellowfin tuna may approach shore when suitable conditions exist. Mid-ocean islands such as the Hawaiian archipelago, other island groups in the Western Pacific, Caribbean, and Maldives islands Indian Ocean, as well as the volcanic islands of the Atlantic such as Ascension Island and Saint Helena, often harbor yellowfin feeding on the baitfish these spots concentrate close to the shoreline. Yellowfin may venture well inshore of the continental shelf when water temperature and clarity are suitable and food is abundant.

Yellowfin tuna often travel in schools with similarly sized companions. They sometimes school with other tuna species and mixed schools of small yellowfin, and skipjack tuna, in particular, are commonplace. They are often associated with various species of dolphins or porpoises, as well as with larger marine creatures such as whales and whale sharks. They also associate with drifting flotsam such as logs and pallets, and sonic tagging indicates some follow moving vessels. Hawaiian yellowfins associate with anchored fish aggregation devices and with certain sections of the 50-fathom curve.

Yellowfin tuna prey include other fish, pelagic crustaceans, and squid. Like all tunas, their body shape is particularly adapted for speed, enabling them to pursue and capture fast-moving baitfish such as flying fish, sauries, and mackerel. Schooling species such as myctophids or lanternfish and similar pelagic driftfish, anchovies, and sardines are frequently taken. Large yellowfins prey on smaller members of the tuna family such as frigate mackerel and skipjack tuna.

In turn, yellowfin are preyed upon when young by other pelagic hunters, including larger tuna, seabirds, and predatory fishes such as wahoo, shark, and billfish. Adults are threatened only by the largest and fastest hunters, such as toothed whales, particularly the false killer whale, pelagic sharks such as the mako and great white, large Atlantic blue marlin and Pacific blue marlin, and black marlin. The main source of mortality, however, is industrial tuna fisheries.

Yellowfins are able to escape most predators, because unlike most fish, tuna are warm-blooded, and their warm muscles make them extremely strong swimmers, with yellowfin tuna reaching "speeds of up to 50 miles per hour". (They can navigate enormous distances, sometimes crossing entire oceans.)

FROM THE ADMIRALS KITCHEN:
JC'S SEARED TUNA:
Ingredients:
2 big handfuls fresh cilantro leaves, finely chopped
1/2 jalapeno, sliced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1 garlic clove, grated
2 limes, juiced
2 tablespoons soy sauce
Pinch sugar
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 (6-ounce) block sushi-quality tuna
1 ripe avocado, halved, peeled, pitted, and sliced

In a mixing bowl, combine the cilantro, jalapeno, ginger, garlic, lime juice, soy sauce, sugar, salt, pepper, and 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Stir the ingredients together until well incorporated.
Place a skillet over medium-high heat and coat with the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Season the tuna generously with salt and pepper. Lay the tuna in the hot oil and sear for 1 minute on each side to form a slight crust. Pour 1/2 of the cilantro mixture into the pan to coat the fish. Serve the seared tuna with the sliced avocado and the remaining cilantro sauce drizzled over the whole plate.

JC'S BAJA GOLD:
INGREDIENTS
2 OZ REPOSADO TEQUILA
.75 OZ PINEAPPLE JUICE
.5 OZ AGAVE SYRUP
LIME WEDGE

Add all ingredients except for the garnish into a shaker tin.
Add ice and shake.
Use your Hawthorne Strainer to strain the drink into a chilled coupe glass.
Garnish with a lime wedge.

Re: CABO SAN LUCAS FISHING REPORT SEPT 9TH [Re: jcsportfishing] #13295575 09/28/19 04:26 AM
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 50,247
banker-always fishing Online Content
Super Freak
Online Content
Super Freak
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 50,247
Nice post and fish. Good job. thumb




IGFA World Record Rio Grande Cichlid. Lake Dunlap.

John 3:16

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