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#11664754 - 06/13/16 03:30 PM Longears
Flags Offline
Outdoorsman

Registered: 03/09/16
Posts: 56
Got into a bunch of longear sunfish at Purtis Creek over the weekend. Caught a bunch like this guy:


Wish I could lie and say I was a true sportsman and turned them all loose but to be honest they had a date with the cornmeal and bacon grease that night. They were downright tasty!

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#11664795 - 06/13/16 03:41 PM Re: Longears [Re: Flags]
J-Moe Online   content
Extreme Angler

Registered: 04/04/14
Posts: 2742
Loc: Brenham, TX
Nice fish Flags. Those are actually Red Breast sunfish.

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#11664807 - 06/13/16 03:47 PM Re: Longears [Re: Flags]
J-Moe Online   content
Extreme Angler

Registered: 04/04/14
Posts: 2742
Loc: Brenham, TX
Here is a picture of a typical long ear sunfish

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#11664853 - 06/13/16 04:11 PM Re: Longears [Re: J-Moe]
banker-always fishing Online   content
TFF Guru

Registered: 07/12/10
Posts: 38212
Loc: Universal City Tx.
Originally Posted By: J-Moe
Nice fish Flags. Those are actually Red Breast sunfish.




Plus #1. Nice fish. cheers
_________________________


IGFA World Record Rio Grande Cichlid. Lake Dunlap.

John 3:16


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#11665193 - 06/13/16 06:32 PM Re: Longears [Re: Flags]
Laker One Offline
TFF Celebrity

Registered: 07/03/11
Posts: 9727
Loc: San Antonio TX
Nice fish. Yep very good eating also. Released to the grease! food

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#11666195 - 06/14/16 09:11 AM Re: Longears [Re: Flags]
highcountry Offline
Extreme Angler

Registered: 03/07/09
Posts: 1258
Loc: Garland, TX
Although most of us here are into conservation of the resource, we DO bring a few home for the skillet occasionally... wink Jos and I don't keep the big ol' breeders, however. Particularly smaller lakes like Purtis and Athens could lose their ability to produce trophy sunfish, if too many of the big boys are kept. It takes several years to grow trophy sunfish, so although rebound might be possible, it would take some time. I lost an amazing bluegill fishery many years ago in Colorado, and it never did return to its former glory.

Harvesting Fish

"It is difficult to provide general, statewide bass and blue-
gill size and harvest limits that will predictably produce
large bluegill. In most cases, no more than 50 adult
bluegill should be harvested per acre per year. Excessive
harvesting of bluegill can deplete the number of large
fish available. Keep in mind that it normally takes at least
6 years for a bluegill to reach 8 inches in length."

From another article...

"Which is the year I caught my first sixteen-ounce bluegill. A public lake near my hometown had been drained and re-stocked four years earlier and was putting out numbers of bluegill over ten inches. Word got out quickly, and within a year of when the big ones showed up, the lake had been hammered with fishing pressure and the lake’s population of bruiser ‘gills had been decimated, never to recover. But I was able to get in on the tail-end of its glory: I had three magical trips, for which I caught at least one pounder bluegill each trip, and two of the trips I had two that weighed a pound each. The average weight of the fish on the best trip was fourteen ounces. My life would never be the same. My bass obsession was obliterated like a scud missile that’s been intercepted by a Patriot."

...and another...

"What happens is when a male bluegill becomes sexually mature, his growth potential slows dramatically. If trophies are the goal, then you want your bluegills to be ‘late bloomers.’ If all the big male bluegills have been taken from their spawning beds, then the younger, smaller males immediately become sexually mature and their growth slows."

“When big alpha males are present, the young bucks don’t waste their energy trying to spawn. Instead, they focus on eating until they become bigger and stronger than the resident alpha males. It’s important to have the biggest and best males reproducing and keeping the other younger males from becoming mature too soon. The biggest damage you can do to a bluegill fishery is to remove the big spawning males. Over time you can drastically change the dynamics of the entire population. It’s recommended that all males over 8 inches be released."


Edited by highcountry (06/14/16 10:46 AM)
_________________________

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#11666931 - 06/14/16 01:58 PM Re: Longears [Re: highcountry]
banker-always fishing Online   content
TFF Guru

Registered: 07/12/10
Posts: 38212
Loc: Universal City Tx.
Originally Posted By: highcountry
Although most of us here are into conservation of the resource, we DO bring a few home for the skillet occasionally... wink Jos and I don't keep the big ol' breeders, however. Particularly smaller lakes like Purtis and Athens could lose their ability to produce trophy sunfish, if too many of the big boys are kept. It takes several years to grow trophy sunfish, so although rebound might be possible, it would take some time. I lost an amazing bluegill fishery many years ago in Colorado, and it never did return to its former glory.

Harvesting Fish

"It is difficult to provide general, statewide bass and blue-
gill size and harvest limits that will predictably produce
large bluegill. In most cases, no more than 50 adult
bluegill should be harvested per acre per year. Excessive
harvesting of bluegill can deplete the number of large
fish available. Keep in mind that it normally takes at least
6 years for a bluegill to reach 8 inches in length."

From another article...

"Which is the year I caught my first sixteen-ounce bluegill. A public lake near my hometown had been drained and re-stocked four years earlier and was putting out numbers of bluegill over ten inches. Word got out quickly, and within a year of when the big ones showed up, the lake had been hammered with fishing pressure and the lake’s population of bruiser ‘gills had been decimated, never to recover. But I was able to get in on the tail-end of its glory: I had three magical trips, for which I caught at least one pounder bluegill each trip, and two of the trips I had two that weighed a pound each. The average weight of the fish on the best trip was fourteen ounces. My life would never be the same. My bass obsession was obliterated like a scud missile that’s been intercepted by a Patriot."

...and another...

"What happens is when a male bluegill becomes sexually mature, his growth potential slows dramatically. If trophies are the goal, then you want your bluegills to be ‘late bloomers.’ If all the big male bluegills have been taken from their spawning beds, then the younger, smaller males immediately become sexually mature and their growth slows."

“When big alpha males are present, the young bucks don’t waste their energy trying to spawn. Instead, they focus on eating until they become bigger and stronger than the resident alpha males. It’s important to have the biggest and best males reproducing and keeping the other younger males from becoming mature too soon. The biggest damage you can do to a bluegill fishery is to remove the big spawning males. Over time you can drastically change the dynamics of the entire population. It’s recommended that all males over 8 inches be released."




Plus #1. Great information HC! cheers
_________________________


IGFA World Record Rio Grande Cichlid. Lake Dunlap.

John 3:16


Top
#11667556 - 06/14/16 07:20 PM Re: Longears [Re: banker-always fishing]
Fishing_4_Life Offline
Outdoorsman

Registered: 02/25/15
Posts: 172
Originally Posted By: banker-always fishing
Originally Posted By: highcountry
Although most of us here are into conservation of the resource, we DO bring a few home for the skillet occasionally... wink Jos and I don't keep the big ol' breeders, however. Particularly smaller lakes like Purtis and Athens could lose their ability to produce trophy sunfish, if too many of the big boys are kept. It takes several years to grow trophy sunfish, so although rebound might be possible, it would take some time. I lost an amazing bluegill fishery many years ago in Colorado, and it never did return to its former glory.

Harvesting Fish

"It is difficult to provide general, statewide bass and blue-
gill size and harvest limits that will predictably produce
large bluegill. In most cases, no more than 50 adult
bluegill should be harvested per acre per year. Excessive
harvesting of bluegill can deplete the number of large
fish available. Keep in mind that it normally takes at least
6 years for a bluegill to reach 8 inches in length."

From another article...

"Which is the year I caught my first sixteen-ounce bluegill. A public lake near my hometown had been drained and re-stocked four years earlier and was putting out numbers of bluegill over ten inches. Word got out quickly, and within a year of when the big ones showed up, the lake had been hammered with fishing pressure and the lake’s population of bruiser ‘gills had been decimated, never to recover. But I was able to get in on the tail-end of its glory: I had three magical trips, for which I caught at least one pounder bluegill each trip, and two of the trips I had two that weighed a pound each. The average weight of the fish on the best trip was fourteen ounces. My life would never be the same. My bass obsession was obliterated like a scud missile that’s been intercepted by a Patriot."

...and another...

"What happens is when a male bluegill becomes sexually mature, his growth potential slows dramatically. If trophies are the goal, then you want your bluegills to be ‘late bloomers.’ If all the big male bluegills have been taken from their spawning beds, then the younger, smaller males immediately become sexually mature and their growth slows."

“When big alpha males are present, the young bucks don’t waste their energy trying to spawn. Instead, they focus on eating until they become bigger and stronger than the resident alpha males. It’s important to have the biggest and best males reproducing and keeping the other younger males from becoming mature too soon. The biggest damage you can do to a bluegill fishery is to remove the big spawning males. Over time you can drastically change the dynamics of the entire population. It’s recommended that all males over 8 inches be released."




Plus #1. Great information HC! cheers


Plus #2

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#11668598 - 06/15/16 09:19 AM Re: Longears [Re: Flags]
Gitter Done Online   content
TFF Celebrity

Registered: 02/06/07
Posts: 9071
Loc: San Antonio Tx.
Nice fish.

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